The mummy study unwrapped: your thoughts

I haven’t posted in quite some time, but my second PhD is now completed and awarded and so I hope to get back to posting more regularly over the next few weeks. I’ll be travelling in the USA this summer as part of my current research in youth justice, but I hope to take any opportunities to look at museums with collections from Kemet. As ever, I’m interested to see how Kemet is represented.

In the meantime, following on from the last article I posted on the reporting of the mummy DNA and alerting you to a question by S.O. Keita in the comments:

This is addressed to the readers of this blog:  What do you find most problematic about the piece on mummy genomes by Schuenemann et al. published in the last two years? Please list one or two things. This will promote a great discussion.

Please share your thoughts…

4 thoughts on “The mummy study unwrapped: your thoughts”

  1. The results from the 2017 Max Planck study is being used by shoddy journalism to overreach just like early Egyptology. The study makes me think of a scenario where some archaeologists 3000 years from now, might come to one site in “ancient America”; Chinatown in New York for instance, where they would dig up some skeletons there, run some DNA tests, and conclude that all ancient Americans during the entire American period were of (Mongoloid) Chinese descent. Of course, we today would know this to be woefully inaccurate as the population has greatly varied over just a few hundred years. Kemet, by comparison, existed for 3000 years. And like any other powerful empire, Kemet developed wide-ranging contacts with empires elsewhere during its long existence. Of course, this would have opened the door to some “interracial mixing” even before the later invasions by the Assyrians, the Greeks, the Romans, and ultimately the Arabs. Any scientists should know that one needs as large a data set as is possible when performing DNA studies to make any sort of accurate conclusions about a population’s history, even over a few hundred years, let alone 3000 years. Solid conclusions cannot be made using 3 individuals from ONE spot from one time period as in the Max Planck study. Further, the thought that some hundreds of millions of Africans could exist in Africa for thousands of years and never build anything or develop a civilization is simply illogical and ridiculously absurd.

  2. Doryu Temple: They are reaching to say the least lol. The way they have framed this is that ancient Egyptians were not black African.. even though they only have 3 samples from 90 mummies in one particular place, in one particular time. It’s pretty laughable. Hopefully since Egypt is only roughly about 30% discovered the deeper the archeologists and scientists dig, they’ll find some intact older mummies from old kingdom etc. I like how they made king tut look white and bald, when his tomb clearly shows him dark skinned with dark Afro hair.

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