“Science” Alert claim that Ancient Egypt is non-African

tweet_kemet_expert

Science Alert’s Article

On 12 April 2018 Michelle Starr, a writer at Science Alert wrote an article on a new archaeological discovery in Sudan. Claiming that the find revealed “A Vast African City of the Dead” [article] . One of the finds, a stela (relief offering) adorned with a representation of the goddess Maat, is described by the writer as having “African features”.

It’s great to see Sudanese archaeology obtaining coverage

But…

When describing the Meroitic language the following passage appears:

[Meroitic] is the earliest known written language of sub-Saharan Africa, written in characters borrowed from the Ancient Egyptians- who were more closely related to the people of the Near East than middle Africa.

 The author then references a limited study examining the DNA of 90 (predominantly Late Period to Roman) mummies from a single site as evidence for this claim. I have contacted the magazine for clarification of why this evidence was prioritised over other research. I am waiting for a response.

At best this is lazy journalism, or someone who simply doesn’t understand the history, culture, and people of Kemet, or their close connections to those of the Nubian region. However, I have written about the intentional separation of these two cultures in previous posts and I can’t help but wonder if this isn’t another example of the whitewashing of Ancient Egypt.

I’m hoping that I’ll get a response to my enquiry and that the editor will consider amending the article. I have no idea why this sentence was even included; it certainly doesn’t add anything to the article other than maintaining a racist ideology, which is exacerbated by the fact that the author stresses the “African-ness” of one culture and totally denies its neighbour of this right.

 

12 thoughts on ““Science” Alert claim that Ancient Egypt is non-African”

  1. Why do the so call contemporaneous western scientist of Egyptology beating around the Bush always by saying that ancient Egypt is a Caucasians or middle eastern civilization, while its very clear that it had originated first in Upper Nile Region(Sudan & South Sudan) before it reached its zenith at the Nile Delta, before Hykos came into kemet by Thousands years?

  2. When addressing this kind of work one has to use both data, critical evaluation of methodology and the philosophy science which refer back to the former. One must ask have the authors excluded any information that would counter their conclusions? Are there alternative explanations for their findings that should be presented? Good work requires the consideration of multiple explanations. Does the work expose a particular school of thought or interpretation, old paradigms, or pieces of such? Are things implied if not explicitly stated that could be or are misleading? Have the authors by implication simplified a complex situation? Have they used total evidence?

  3. private/inquiry

    I stumbled upon this blog. You have some amazing work here. My tribe (Nyanja) from central Africa has many oral historical recollections of their origins from North Africa. I have always wondered whether the religious practices have any connection to Egyptian ancient practices. The masked dancers and secret society of the Chewa bear a resemblance to some ancient Egyptian gods…any thoughts?

  4. @Saart. Ths question was not about the origins of the language but rather of which language family it was most closely aligned to. I am already familiar with its Wolof parallels, but then again, the question is of language family, whereas the latter is of the so-called Niger Congo, when I specifically bisected Afro-Asiatic and Nilo-Saharan for effect.

  5. I still dont see why people keep asking where the language comes from There are no pyramids or buildings anyone in ” The Levant ” with Egyptian Hieroglyphics, yet there are peoples in Africa with languages that are eerily similar to Ancient Egyptian, for example.
    https://qph.fs.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-dad398676f143631d60dac1d807f111c.webp

    Pharaonic Egyptian – Wolof; (Wolof meaning)

    aam – aam : seize (take this)
    aar – aar : paradise (divine protection)
    Aku – Aku : foreigners (Creole descendants of European traders and African wives)
    anu – K.enou : pillar
    atef – ate : a crown of Osiris, judge of the soul (to judge)
    ba – bei : the ram-god (goat)
    bai – bai : a priestly title (father)
    ben ben – ben ben : overflow, flood
    bon – bon : evil
    bu – bu : place
    bu bon – bu bon : evil place
    bu nafret – bu rafet : good place
    da – da : child
    deg – deega : to see, to look at carefully (to understand)
    deresht – deret : blood
    diou – diou rom : five
    djit – djit : magistrate (guide, leader)
    Djoob – Djob : a surname
    dtti – datti : the savage desert (the savage brush)
    Etbo – temb : the ‘floater’ (to float)
    fei – fab : to carry
    fero – fari : king
    iaay – yaay : old woman (mother)
    ire – yer : to make
    itef – itef : father
    kat – kata : vagina (to have sexual intercourse)
    kau – kaou : elevated, above (heaven)
    kau – kau : high, above, heaven
    kaw – kaw : height
    kef – kef : to seize, grasp
    kem -khem : black (burnt, burnt black)
    kemat – kematef : end of a period, completion, limit
    khekh – khekh : to fight, to wage war, war
    kher – ker : country (house)
    kwk – kwk : darkness
    lebou – Lebou : those at the stream, Lebou/fishermen Senegal
    maat – mat : justice
    maga – mag : veteran, old person
    mer – maar : love (passionate love)
    mun – won : buttocks
    nag – nag : bull (cattle)
    nak – nak : ox, bull (cow)
    NDam – NDam : throne
    neb – ndab : float
    nen – nen : place where nothing is done (nothingness)
    nit – nit : citizen
    Ntr – Twr : protecting god, totem
    nwt – nit : fire of heaven (evening light)
    o.k. – wah keh : correct, right
    onef – onef : he (past tense)
    ones – ones : she (past tense)
    onsen – onsen : they (past tense)
    pe – pey : capital, heaven (King’s capital)
    per – per : house (the wall surrounding the house)
    pur – bur : king
    ram – yaram : body, shoulder (body)
    rem – erem : to weap, tears (compassion)
    ro – ro : mouth (to swallow)
    sa – sa : wise, educated, to teach
    seh – seh : noble (dignitary)
    seked – seggay : a slope
    sen – sen : brother
    sent – san : sister
    set – set : woman (wife)
    shopi – sopi : to transform
    sity – seety : to prove
    sok – sookha : to pound grain (sokh – to strike, beat)
    ta – ta : earth, land (inundated earth)
    ta tenen – ten : first lands (clay of first humans)
    tefnit – tefnit : to spit
    tem – tem : to completely stop doing something
    tn.r – dener : to remember (to imagine)
    top – bop : top of head
    twr – twr : libation
    uuh – uuf : carry
    wer – wer : great, trustworth

    Why would Black West Africans language be this Similar? The Pyramids, found in Zinder, Niger are also another dead give away, plus the Ruins in South Africa, that have Pyramids engraved on the stones.

  6. Modern research has done such a great job of illuminating the African roots of this ancient culture that all other assumptions seem antiquated; but sadly many continue to cling on to the Eurasian migrant theory until the bitter end. I believe that much more could be glossed from the history if observers would just simply open their minds, for there is much more to know and appreciate about the culture that is ancient KMT.

    The linguistic roots of KMT is a dead giveaway, and it is hardly discussed by most modern scholars. My question is, does the language of ancient KMT share more affinities to the Nilo-Saharan family than the Afro-Asiatic, which would place it more in line with the Sudanic and Nubian languages? Its relations to Semetic and the Near-Eastern languages has already been defeated on all grounds. Thank you.

  7. Thank you sally for challenging these misleading lies and is hard for a white woman as yourself being an advocate for a black egypt. Are you perceived differently by other egyptologist?

    1. Egyptologists often disagree with interpretations of materials. I am different to many Egyptologists in my training because I have a background in both Classical languages and archaeology as well as those related to Egypt. The last 7 years of my career as a professional Egyptologist were also spent researching other African cultures.

      1. My question is why would this individual even need to bring that up? It seems to me that there is almost this obsession in the field of pop science to push Ancient Egypt as non-African. They’re the ones that keep telling us that “race doesn’t matter” and all of that yet they seem pretty intent on trying to prove that the Ancient Egyptians weren’t African (despite the fact that Ancient Kemet was, yes, in Africa).

      2. Hello Sally, I recently stumbled upon your website and rediscovered your passion and steadfastness for the truth as it pertains to the peopling of Kemet. We met in Manchester in 2009 at the “Egypt in its African Context” conference where I presented my paper “Unwrapping Egyptology” which also appears in my book The Battle for Kemet. I believe I may have given you a copy. I commended you then for the work you were doing on Kemet and the work you were engaged in with the incarcerated.

        As you may recall Frank Yurco (Egyptologist at the Field Museum and Oriental Institute at the University of Chicago) who was the subject of my paper “Unwrapping Egyptology” had unfortunately made his transition in 2004. However, the fact remains that Frank admitted in 1999 that the depiction of ancient Egyptians as painted on a wall in the tomb of Ramesses III showing them with the same black skin color and dress as the Kushites was a valid representation of how they (the Kemites) saw themselves. While this alone won’t be enough to sway some naysayers it could at least provide food for thought and add to the arsenal of facts considering that Frank was far from being African centered. Looking forward to reading more on this site.

        1. Hi Charles, yes of course I remember. In fact I have shown your book to a number of people over the years, as well as using it myself. Thank you for sharing this fact. It’s great to hear from you.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *